Criminal and Community Justice, and Social Work
Rewarding and dynamic professions for those with a strong desire to help people and empower them to change their lives.
40+
certified agencies for field placement

Criminal and community justice, and social work graduates work with individuals, groups, agencies, and programs to improve social conditions in everyday lives. Working with individuals, the focus ranges from addressing personal or family challenges to creating safer communities. The curriculum cultivates critical thinking, communications skills, and research and theory-based knowledge that benefits graduates for employment and graduate school opportunities. Successful professionals in these fields need to be aware of social issues and demonstrate an understanding of the qualities necessary to work with a variety of groups including children, families, people living with physical or mental health challenges, victims and perpetrators of crimes, persons with addictions, the elderly, or a combination of these characteristics. Criminal and community justice, and social work majors provide a strong emphasis on ethical decision-making, social justice, and issues related to diversity within society.

Career Examples
  • Elderly and disability services
  • Family and children's services
  • Hospitals and health systems
  • Nonprofit agencies
  • Social services
  • Local, state, and federal government
  • Police/patrol officer
  • Probation/parole officer
  • Correctional officer/bailiff
  • Victim advocate
  • Paralegal/legal assistant

Program Information

These programs are strongly grounded in an interdisciplinary liberal arts tradition while also offering practical opportunities for students to gain field experience and professional certifications. Small class sizes encourage interaction, discussion, and more individualized attention. Students learn the importance of justice in all areas of life, respect for the human dignity of the individual, and a lifelong commitment to service in the community. They learn about the roles that class, race, and gender play in public policy and systems, while developing skills in critical thinking, communication, and ethical decision-making.

Criminal and Community Justice (B.A.)

Viterbo’s criminal and community justice program provides students with exposure to many aspects of the legal system and careers in corrections, the courts, law enforcement, and victim services. Viterbo students will not only gain knowledge of the structure and function of the criminal justice system, but develop awareness of social issues; ethics; and the role of class, race, and gender in their profession. The major focuses on the importance of communities in addressing and finding solutions for delinquent and criminal behavior.

Criminal and Community Justice (Minor)

Minors at Viterbo University generally require between 15–25 credits upon completion. Transfer course and waivers and/or substitutions could modify these credit totals.

Criminal and Community Justice (B.S.)

Viterbo’s criminal and community justice program provides students with exposure to many aspects of the legal system and careers in corrections, the courts, law enforcement, and victim services. Viterbo students will not only gain knowledge of the structure and function of the criminal justice system, but develop awareness of social issues; ethics; and the role of class, race, and gender in their profession. The major focuses on the importance of communities in addressing and finding solutions for delinquent and criminal behavior.

Sociology (Minor)

The Sociology minor is designed to promote interdisciplinary collaboration for students majoring in another field. Students find sociology to be a highly flexible and applicable minor to pair with their major field of study in order to investigate theoretical ideas and social relations within institutions and organizations that exist in society. The sociology minor will encourage students to better understand the social relationships we participate in everyday, while also driving students to learn more about the intricacies of sociology as it relates to their major.

Social Work (B.A.)

Viterbo’s social work program is nationally accredited by the Council on Social Work Education and provides students with the hands-on and experiential learning necessary to prepare them for a rewarding and dynamic profession. As part of this program, students will participate in a 30-hour per week, 450-hour internship in a social service setting working with a trained social work field instructor. Small classes and challenging courses are led by caring faculty who have extensive experience as social workers.

Family Studies (Minor)

The Family Studies minor is an interdisciplinary program which focuses on human development within the family context. The two primary focuses of the minor are on nature of family interactions and family issues, and family interactions within broader social institutions. Students take mainly a mixture of social work and psychology courses, helped with options in nursing, philosophy and criminal justice classes, in order to fulfill the requirements laid out to become a family studies minor. The minor is beneficial to all students and supports work in a variety of fields including health care, social services, counseling, youth services, teaching, ministry, family law, and business.

Social Work (B.S.)

Viterbo’s social work program is nationally accredited by the Council on Social Work Education and provides students with the hands-on and experiential learning necessary to prepare them for a rewarding and dynamic profession. As part of this program, students will participate in a 30-hour per week, 450-hour internship in a social service setting working with a trained social work field instructor. Small classes and challenging courses are led by caring faculty who have extensive experience as social workers.

Gerontology (Minor)

The Viterbo University gerontology minor serves the purpose of broadening the student’s understanding of the aging process. This multidisciplinary minor examines the biological, psychological, and social aspects of aging. Gerontology includes courses in nursing, sociology, social work, nutrition and dietetics, psychology, religious studies, biology, and philosophy. The population is aging- in this region, the United States, and the rest of the world. The number of people over the age of 65 is expected to increase from 37.9 million in 2007, to 71.5 million in 2030. Worldwide, there is an expected increase of 140 percent by 2030, representing a global challenge. A minor in gerontology from Viterbo University is an effective way to obtain secondary knowledge that will be extremely transferrable onto the job market, in careers ranging from nursing to social work.  The total credits of the minor requirements are 15. Transfer course, waivers and/or substitutions, and prerequisite courses could modify these credit totals.

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